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Green ITS Researchers

Principle Investigator

  1. Amir Khajepour

Co-Investigators

  1. Baher Abdulhai
  2. Catherine Burns
  3. Claudio Canizares
  4. Dongpu Cao
  5. Richard Culham
  6. Sebastian Fischmeister
  7. Michael Fowler
  8. Roydon Fraser
  9. Bruce Hellinga
  10. Jonathan Histon
  11. Jan Paul Huissoon
  12. Shesha Jayaram
  13. Mohamed Kamel
  14. Fakhri Karray
  15. Mehrdad Kazerani
  16. Stephan Lambert
  17. John McPhee
  18. William Melek
  19. Patricia Nieva
  20. Catherine Rosenberg
  21. Safieddin (Ali) Safavi-Naeini
  22. Orang Vahid-Araghi
  23. Shahrokh Valaee
  24. Steven Waslander
  25. John Wen

Principal Investigator (PI)

Amir Khajepour, Professor, Canada Research Chair in Mechatronic Vehicle Systems, Executive Director - Waterloo Center for Automotive Research (WatCAR), Academic Director - Initiative for Automotive Manufacturing Innovation (IAMI), Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Khajepour is an expert in system modeling and control of dynamic systems and has developed an extensive research program by applying his expertise in several key multidisciplinary areas. He has 10 patents (5 awarded, 2 pending and 3 provisional), a number of technology transfers, 2 start-up companies and more than 200 journal and conference publications including three books and 6 book chapters. His work in modeling, analysis, and in-situ optimization of vehicle mounting systems has resulted in a new method in optimization of passenger cars and pickup truck mounting systems that is used by a Tier 1 automotive company. His work in mechatronic vehicle systems including active vehicle stability, air-hybrid engines, design and optimization of hybrid vehicles, and in-wheel suspension systems has resulted in many publications and several patents and technology transfers. His invention in the development of a new class of cable robots has been patented and commercialized by a spin-off company. His pioneering work in the modeling and control of laser cladding is recognized globally and has produced a new technology that has been transferred to industry. Dr. Khajepour is a recipient of two best paper awards, a fellow of Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering, and Associate Editor of the International Journal of Vehicle Autonomous Systems.

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Co-Investigators

  1. Baher Abdulhai, Professor, Canada Research Chair in Intelligent Transportation Systems; Chair - University of Toronto Transportation Research and Advancement Centre; Director - Intelligent Transportation Systems Centre, University of Toronto, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Abdulhai is recognized internationally as a leader in a major new field called Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), which involves the application of information technology and other advanced methods to improve the performance of transportation systems. As a Canada Research Chair, he is building on the work he has already accomplished at the University of Toronto's ITS Centre by creating an unprecedented multi-disciplinary ITS research cluster to tackle the major issues in transportation. In so doing, Abdulhai is helping to establish Canada as a world leader in this vital area.

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  1. Catherine Burns, Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Burns is one of the top researchers in Canada in the area of Human-Computer Interface Design and a world leader in Cognitive Work Analysis. She has over 140 publications in these areas. She has published 2 well-known textbooks on both of these topics as well as Display Design standards documents. Cognitive Work Analysis is a systematic engineering method for examining human work in complex technical systems and as such is well suited to understanding user requirements in future highly automated driving environments. She has a strong track record of developing useful and effective interface designs that reduce cognitive load and reduce human error leading to safer human-machine systems. Many of her designs are currently use in other industries, confirming her ability to successfully transfer her research results into commercial products.

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  1. Claudio Canizares, Professor, Hydro One Endowed Chair and Associate Director of the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy (WISE), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Canizares is a world-renowned expert in the modelling, simulation and analysis of power systems in the context of competitive electricity markets. During the past few years he has also been working and making novel and recognized contributions in the modelling, simulation and analysis of integrated energy systems with multiple energy carriers such as electricity, gas, hydrogen and heat. The latter work has led to more recent research activities and relevant contributions on various technical issues associated with the integration of PHEVs with the grid and associated markets. In this particular area, he is currently leading a group of researchers preparing a strategic report entitled "Electricity's role in Sustainable Mobility: A Plan for Ontario" for the Plug N Drive Alliance, a group of industry and government institutions studying and promoting the adoption of PHEVs in Ontario, co-funded by the Ontario Centres of Excellence and various Alliance member s. Therefore, he is expected to make significant contributions to the studies of the interactions of PHEVs with the electricity grid and markets.

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  1. Dongpu Cao, NSERC and MRI Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Cao's main research areas include modelling, dynamics, optimization, control and integration of automotive systems, related to which Dr. Cao has contributed about 30 journal/conference publications and various technical reports/invited talks. Attributed to his contributions to the research areas, Dr. Cao has been invited to serve as Committee member for 5 International Technical/Standardization Committees in automotive engineering, including ASME Vehicle Design Committee, SAE Chassis and Suspension Committee, SAE Vehicle Dynamics Standards Committee, SAE Drivetrain, Powertrain and Transmission Committee, and SAE Materials Modelling and Testing Comittee. Apart from annually co-organizing three ASME and SAE Conferences on advanced vehicle technologies, Dr. Cao has also been invited to serve as Guest Co-Editor for:

Dr. Cao's research expertise on modelling, dynamics, optimization, control and integration of automotive systems would contribute to the success of this ORF-GITS proposal, particularly Theme #1: Next Generation of Electric Vehicles.

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  1. Richard Culham, Professor, Associate Dean, Research and External Partnerships, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

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  1. Sebastian Fischmeister, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Modern society depends on the embedded devices. Each Canadian typically relies on about 100-500 embedded systems each day found in elevators, cars, cameras, cash registers, pacemakers, power grid control. Building such systems is difficult due to the complex interaction of functionality, resource consumption, and timing. Dr. Fischmeister focuses on two aspects of embedded software: (a) finding good software abstractions, and (b) assist/automate development activities such as debugging. For the former, he successfully created an abstraction that separates logic, timing, and communication and enable the developer to code them independently. The abstraction is in use for the reference implementation and prototype of the ASTM F29.21 standard on the Integrated Clinical Environment in use at MGH/CIMIT Boston and two other research universities. For the latter, he successfully created a time-aware software tracing mechanism useful for real-time systems and interrupts with prototypes supporting platforms including ATMEL AVR and ARM9.

  1. Michael Fowler, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Fowler's primary research interests are in the design and performance of vehicle drive trains that include electrochemical power sources such as batteries and fuel cell. Thus his research includes design of fuel cell stacks and systems, including the modelling of fuel cell system reliability, and research into potential failure modes and causes experienced in batteries and fuel cells stacks. This research now focuses on electrochemical power sources in vehicles, specifically degradation analysis and control of batteries in hybrid and plug-in hybrid power trains. In order to adequately model fuel cell performance and reliability, an interest in both battery and fuel cell simulation, as well reliability analysis of materials. Control systems and maintenance planning over the life of batteries and fuel cells stack must account for degradation and changes in the performance characteristics. Dr. Fowler's research includes these adaptive control systems for fuel cell and fuel cell/battery hybrid systems. Thus, his research group is interested in performance evaluation, diagnostics, and forensics associated with fuel cell stacks, single cells and batteries. Dr. Fowler has experience as the co-faculty supervisor of undergraduate competitive vehicle team design projects (ChallengeX, EcoCar), projects that involve the design, construction, implementation and testing hybrid vehicles. Of particular note is Waterloo's ChallengeX Crossover to Sustainable Mobility project. For this project, a Chevrolet Equinox was converted into a fuel cell/battery hybrid vehicle with a 65 kW PEM fuel cell in combination with a 70 kW nickel metal hydride battery. The experience with the University of Waterloo Alternative Fuel Team and the associated research projects clearly demonstrated a capability with design and modelling (including vehicle drive train modelling in Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT), vehicle Hardware in the Loop, and vehicle integration, as well as actual prototype implementation. This experience includes electric drive train vehicles, with both battery power sources, and hydrogen fuel cell power sources. As such, Dr. Fowler will contribute an expertise in the electrochemical power sources to be used on the Green Vehicles under consideration in this proposal.

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  1. Roydon Fraser, Professor, Associate Chair Undergraduate Studies, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Fraser's research interests focus on energy conversion systems. Fundamental work includes the characterization of spark ignition engine combustion, the integration and control of alternative fuels powertrains into vehicles, and the application of energy and the second law of thermodynamics to the characterization and optimization complex thermodynamic systems. Prof. Fraser has an expertise in turbulent combustion and non-intrusive combustion diagnostics as applied to internal combustion engines, in alternative fuel vehicle development with particular emphasis on natural gas, ethanol and hydrogen (fuel cells) fuels and recent emphasis on hybrid vehicles. From 1997 to present he has he supervised student teams competing against teams from across North America to four first, two second, and three forth place finishes propane, ethanol, and hybrid vehicle competitions. Currently the team is converting a Saturn Vue to a hydrogen fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric power train based on a software-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop developed design process.

Based on the recent experience with development of hybrid fuel cell vehicles Dr. Fraser is well positioned to make, and has demonstrated interest in making, significant research contributions that advance the integration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles into the mix of vehicles used by society.

Dr. Fraser is currently Associate Chair Undergraduate Studies, past-President of the University of Waterloo Faculty Association, is serving in his eighth year as a Professional Engineers Ontario Councillor, is a life member of the Sandford Fleming Foundation, is a member of the Ontario Engineering Competition Board, and is a founding Board member of Engineers Without Boarders - Ingénieurs Sans FrontiPres Board.

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  1. Bruce Hellinga, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Hellinga is an expert in the area of traffic engineering and control and has specific expertise and experience in the evaluation of the safety and operational impacts of various intelligent transportation system components and transportation policies. Dr. Hellinga obtained his PhD in 1994 from Queen's University, ON where he made significant contributions to the INTEGRATION microscopic traffic simulation model, software that has been commercialized and distributed world-wide. He has developed a strong multidisciplinary research group at the University of Waterloo that focuses on developing and evaluating the safety, operational, and environmental impacts of various traffic and transit technologies and policies. His major contributions include: (1) the development of a method of estimating real-time highway safety using simulated or field data; (2) the incorporation of this model within a traffic simulation model to permit the safety evaluation of advanced traffic interaction and control strategies; and (3) The statistical evaluation of probe vehicle data for the purposes of traffic state estimation. A key element of the proposed project is the development of suitable strategies for the longitudinal and lateral control of intelligent vehicles and quantitatively evaluating the impacts (safety, environment, and traffic operations) of these intelligent vehicles operating within a mixed traffic stream. Dr. Hellinga will contribute his expertise and experience conducting similar types of research to the specific challenges of this project.

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  1. Jonathan Histon, Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Histon is a new Professor at the University of Waterloo. His research focuses on understanding how the properties of the system being controlled impact the decision-making of human operators in complex systems. He has experience observing and investigating operator interaction with decision support systems. His research background includes the identification of key system characteristics used to manage complexity in air traffic control, and the development of partial task human-in-the-loop simulation environments. His current projects include the development of simpler, generic, airspace, the development of novel display treatments supporting collaboration in aircraft cockpits, and the development of decision support tools supporting time-critical decision making.

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  1. Jan Paul Huissoon, Professor, Director of Mechatronics Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Huissoon has been principal investigator (with Prof Francois Michaud, U. Sherbrooke) of the Auto21 'Dynamic Collaborative Driving' project from 2005-09, and in which he supervised (with Prof. C. Clark) several projects involving intelligent control of vehicle manoeuvres, localization and coordination. His area of research is autonomous systems, with specific expertise in sensor based robotics and intelligent weld process control. The computing and Virtual Reality research infrastructure at Waterloo will be used for modelling and simulation of detailed vehicle dynamics and multivariable control, and the operation and control of multiple vehicles operating in an ad hoc network.

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  1. Shesha Jayaram, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Jayaram's expertise is in the field of high voltage and insulation engineering and pulse power technology. Her expertise will be of value in specific with performance evaluation of the energy storage elements and in the electric highway design. Jayaram will be working in collaboration with Professors from both the MME and ECE in optimising the design and use of supercapacitors and batteries by studying the thermal behaviour of supercapacitors. The research facilities in her laboratory are of immense help in characterizing the thermal behaviour under both electric and thermal stresses. Because of her background in electrical insulation engineering, she will be contributing in optimising the design of supercapacitors in understanding the dielectric materials of such devices. The compact designs used in the development of supercapacitors require high efficiency cooling of these high energy devices; thus it is important to investigate the effects of transient voltages and their impact on supercapacitors.

In the design of electric highway, she will be investigating the effects of high frequency transients on the insulation integrity of the interconnected power grid. When we share the existing power grid for highway charging, it is important to analyse the various types of transients that would enter the interconnected power grid. These transients are generated by the fast switching of large energy storage capacitors, and also at a relatively fast switching speed. As a result, the transients can contain a large number of high harmonic contents. Such harmonics can induce voltages up to 2.5 to 3.0 pu as a result of resonance. The effects of such high frequency high voltage stresses on the system insulation must be studied in order to protect the system from failures related to system insulation. Further, it is also important to protect the vehicles and the users by assuring safe charging, with respect to grounding system. Her expertise in high voltage and insulation engineering is of critical need for this field.

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  1. Mohamed Kamel, Professor, Canada Research Chair in Cooperative Intelligent Systems, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Kamel is the Director of the Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI) Research Group, one of the leading research laboratories in Canada, with 4 faculty members and 30 graduate students and about 10 adjunct members from Universities and Industry. The research focus of this group is in intelligent systems, pattern recognition, and perception with emphasis on cooperative and adaptive techniques. Members of the research group have spun-off 4 companies to commercialize technologies developed in their laboratory. Dr. Kamel has managed two strategic grant applications and many industrial grants as well as projects funded by centers of excellence. He is a theme leader of NSERC LORNET research network. He has authored over 300 papers in journals, and conference proceedings and graduated over 69 Master and PhD students. Dr. Kamel is recipient of the University of Waterloo outstanding performance award, the faculty of engineering distinguished performance award, best paper awards in three international conferences and NCR inventor award. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of EIC and serves on the editorial boards of 5 international journals.

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  1. Fakhri Karray, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Karray is the Associate Director of the Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence laboratory in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo. Dr. Karray's research interests are in the areas of intelligent systems and soft computing, autonomous agents, distributed sensing and natural man-machine interaction. Dr. Karray's expertise in Human-Machine Interaction and intelligent systems design should be useful in benefiting the area of the proposal pertinent to collaborative driving. Imparting the vehicle of the future with some sort of cognitive abilities and perception through intelligent sensing devices and advanced man-machine interfaces should assist in designing more autonomous driving capabilities while allowing the driver of executing a number of tasks not currently possible with existing technology.

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  1. Mehrdad Kazerani, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Kazerani is a full Professor at the University of Waterloo. He is an expert in power electronics, author/co-author of over 80 publications, and internationally recognized for his research in the area of power electronics. He has extensive experience in analysis, design, simulation and implementation of power electronic circuits and systems including: photovoltaic grid-connected inverters, fuel cell power conversion systems for residential and automotive applications, wind energy conversion systems, frequency changers, pulse power, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle modelling and multidisciplinary optimization, and energy storage. He has written a chapter in the Handbook of Automotive Power Electronics and Motor Drives published by CRC press in 2005. He holds a patent on a High-Voltage DC Power Supply for which he has received an award from Honeywell. He has also filed a US patent on a Switched-Capacitor Regenerative Snubber. His research has been supported by agencies such as NSERC, ESTAC and OCE, and companies such as Honeywell, Magna, GE, Hydro One and Virelec. He is part of two flagship OCE-sponsored projects on large grid-connected photovoltaic farms and micro-grids for remote northern communities. Based on his strong background in power engineering and long-term experience with the design of power electronic converters and their controllers, Dr. Kazerani can make significant contributions to the objectives of the proposed research in the areas of home-based and public battery charging systems, design of vehicle-grid interface for safe and reliable bidirectional transactions, power quality control at the interface with the grid, and modelling and multidisciplinary optimization of PHEVs.

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  1. Stephan Lambert, Professor, NSERC-General Motors of Canada Chair in Collaborative Design, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Lambert's focus is the development of engineering design case studies for use throughout the engineering curriculum to demonstrate design and the application of engineering science concepts in real situations. His research takes a learning approach to improving design, and is directly related to the proposed research. He is involved with two AUTO21 research projects focused on the design of electric and hybrid electric vehicles. These projects have investigated the use of ultracapacitors in hybrid electric vehicles, energy management and design intergation, and the development of vehicle control strategies to take advantage of the benefits of electric drivetrains. Dr. Lambert is the theme coordinator for Design Processes, within the AUTO21 Network Centre of Excellence, and the Canadian task leader for fatigue for the three-country (Canada, China, and the United States) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project.

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  1. John McPhee, Professor and NSERC/Toyota/Maplesoft Industrial Research Chair in Mathematics-based Modelling and Design, Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. McPhee's main area of research is system dynamics and control, with principal application to the analysis and design of vehicles, mechatronic devices, and biomechanical systems. He won a Premier's Research Excellence Award in 2000, and the I.W. Smith Award from the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2001. Dr. McPhee has published 60 papers in the top journals in his field, consulted to many industries in Canada and the United States, and appeared as an expert witness in the Federal Court of Canada. Dr. McPhee is an Associate Editor for seven international journals, including the International Journal of Vehicle Systems Modelling and Testing and the International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems. In 2005, he was elected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He researched, developed, and brought to market DynaFlexPro, a commercial software package for modelling and simulating the dynamics of mechanical multibody systems, and DynaFlexPro/Tire, an add-on package specifically developed for the real-time simulation and control of complex vehicle systems. Dr. McPhee is a co-applicant on a provisional patent for active steering. His research contributions on vehicle dynamics and stability, as well as his work in multidisciplinary design optimization, are highly relevant to several of the projects in this ORF proposal.

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  1. William Melek, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Melek's expertise includes design of estimation models and vehicle control systems, design of flexible manufacturing solutions particularly modular and reconfigurable robotic systems (MRRs). The researcher's expertise also spans micromanipulation, theoretical and practical robotics and automation, intelligent control of advanced mechatronics applications, and computational intelligence theory and applications. A secondary research areas is bioinformatics and biomechanics The researcher also holds several patents in bioinformatics-based clinical decision support systems.

Dr. Melek extended the non-traditional fuzzy logic based reasoning theory to develop a novel class of type II models vehicle suspension control, and mobile robotics autonomous tracking. His current endeavours in this area deals with the development of intelligent models for design of vehicle stability controllers, and autonomous steering system control design. Dr. Melek's experience thus far will enable him to make several contributions to the objectives outlines in this ORF-GITS submission.

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  1. Patricia Nieva, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Nieva has been working in different projects related to MEMS sensors for harsh environments for the past ten years. Her expertise includes among others, the development of MEMS structures for in-cylinder monitoring and multifunctional sensing, un-cooled microbolometers for space applications, fiber-optic displacement sensors for harsh environments and label-free optical BioMEMS sensors for protein and pathogen detection for point-of-care applications. She also has extensive hands-on experience in the fabrication and material property characterization of robust and IC-compatible MEMS materials for high temperature operation, silicon based surface and bulk micromachining fabrication, and micro-encapsulation techniques. She has also work extensively on the modelling of MEMS, the effects of squeeze film and airflow damping in MEMS, and MEMS reliability. She has supervised more than 30 undergraduate projects and is currently supervising two post doctoral fellows, one research engineer, seven graduate students and five co-op students. She has consulted for Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada (TMMC) and the Canadian Space Agency, and is currently part of the Early Warning Inc. main team involved in the development of BioMEMS sensors for E-coli detection. She has published more than 40 refereed journal and conference papers in her field. Dr. Nieva's ongoing research work constitutes an important commitment to the identification of simple, cost-effective and reliable micro and nano-technologies for advanced sensing in harsh environments.

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  1. Catherine Rosenberg, Professor and University Research Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Roesenberg is University Research Chair and a Professor in the Department of ECE at the University of Waterloo. In 2004, she moved to Canada from the United States where she was on the faculty of Purdue University. Prof. Rosenberg was Director of the Purdue Center of Wireless Systems and Applications, a multi-school and multidisciplinary center that aimed at developing the next generation of wireless networks, devices, and systems. She also has extensive industrial experience having worked at Alcatel, AT&T Bell Labs and more recently heading a research department in satellite networks at Nortel, UK. She has 8 patents in networking to her credit and also serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of Orange (France Telecom). Her technical contributions are in the broad field of networking with a focus on resource management and performance analysis of wireless and wireline networks. Prof. Rosenberg is recognized for her systems, applications, and wireless networking contributions as well as her strong links with industry. She has authored over 100 papers that are widely cited.

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  1. Safieddin (Ali) Safavi-Naeini, Professor, NSERC/RIM Industrial Research Chair in Intelligent Integrated Radio and Photonics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Safavi-Naeini is a professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo and holds the NSERC/RIM Industrial Research Chair Intelligent Integrated Radio/Antenna Systems and Novel Electromagnetic Media Technologies and the Director of the Center for Intelligent Antenna and Radio Systems (CIARS). He has more than 25 years of research experience in antenna and RF/Microwave technologies as well as computational electromagnetics and is currently the coordinator of RF/Microwave & Photonics group at the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo. Professor Safavi-Naeini has led several international collaborative research programs with research institutes in Germany (DAAD fund), Finland (Nokia), Japan (Sumitomo, Tokoyo IT), China (BVERI, Institute of Optics), which have resulted in numerous efficient modelling tools, innovative design concepts, and novel technologies in RF/Microwave and photonics. He has been scientific and technical consultant to many Canadian, USA, European, and Asian international companies. Over the last few years he has been directing a number of extensive research projects in CAD of complex microwave structures (Ericsson, 1999-2002), intelligent foldable car-to-satellite tracking antenna (2001-2002, first of its kind and being commercialized by C-Com Satellite Systems, Ottawa), smart antenna/radio system for wireless communications (Bell Mobility, 2001-2005), very low profile phased array system for car-to-satellite communications (Winegard Co., 2002-present), low-profile multi-band antenna, integrated antenna/radio systems, planar array for road-side units for vehicular communication and networking (Mark IV, 2004- Present) successfully. His innovative research on compact and downsized antenna structures have received considerable attention in relevant international communities.

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  1. Orang Vahid-Araghi, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Vahid has recently received his PhD from University of Waterloo. His research interests include automotive noise and vibrations, nonlinear vibrations, nonlinear control, and robotics. Dr. Vahid's research expertise in modelling of dynamical systems, optimization, stability, and automotive noise and vibrations would contribute to the success of this ORF-GITS proposal, particularly Theme #1: Next Generation of Electric Vehicles.

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  1. Shahrokh Valaee, Associate Professor, Nortel Institute Junior Chair of Communication Networks, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Valaee has twenty years of experience in academia and industry and has worked in both signal processing and networking. Dr. Valaee has had collaboration with many companies including Mark IV Industries, LG Electronics, SONY Corporation, Bell Canada and so on, and has been the lead PI in many research programs including AUTO21 NCE, NSERC Strategic on vehicular networks. He has supervised the research of more than 50 graduate and undergraduate students and post-doc fellows. Prof. Valaee has been a consultant to governmental research organizations and private research sectors and has served on the technical committee boards of many international conferences. He is the founder of the Wireless and Internet Research Laboratory (WIRLab) in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto. He is the author of more than one hundred papers and has served as the guest editor for IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine and the Journal of Wireless Communication and Mobile Computing. He was the Co-Chair of the Wireless Communication and Networking Symposium of IEEE GLOBECOM 2006 and given plenary keynote speeches in major international conferences. He is now a guest editor of a special issue on "Vehicular Ad Hoc Network" for the EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing.

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  1. Steven Waslander, Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Waslander is a new Professor at the University of Waterloo. He comes with experience in autonomous aerial vehicles and multi-agent system design. His research background includes the development of cooperative and non-cooperative coordination algorithms for resource allocation in air traffic flow control, and development of cooperative teams of autonomous quadrotor helicopters.  His current projects include enabling small aerial vehicles to perceive, plan and coordinate in a decentralized manner without off-board processing.

Prof. Waslander will be a significant contributor to the collaborative driving aspect of the Intelligent Vehicles theme of GITS. He plans to adapt his methodologies for decentralized coordination of multiple aerial vehicles to the collaborative highway driving problem, and his previous work in air traffic flow control will allow him unique insights into the highway traffic flow management problem, automated lane assignment and traffic intersection autonomation.

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  1. John Wen, Assistant Professor, Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo

Relevant Qualifications

Dr. Wen has more than eight years of professional experience in power industry and has worked for the design and development of ICEs and gas turbines for power generation. He has conducted research on the development of next-generation energy storage systems through the investigations on the synthesis, characterization, manipulation and functionalization of nano-structured electrodes of supercapacitors. He possesses research experience in fields of mechanical, chemical and material engineering by conducting both experimental and theoretical studies.

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